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  Linux find command usage practices
     
  Add Date : 2016-05-23      
         
         
         
  One, find brief order

Under Linux find command to search for files in the directory structure, and perform the specified action. Under Linux find command provides a considerable number of search criteria, very powerful. Since the find has powerful features, so it's also a lot of options, most of which options are worth our time to find out. Even if the system contains a Network File System (NFS), find command is equally effective in the file system, you only have the appropriate permissions. When you run a very resource-consuming find command, many people tend to put it in the background, because traversing a large file system may take a long time (here refers to 30G bytes or more file systems).

1. Format:

find pathname -options [-print -exec -ok ...]

2. Use this command:

Find files in the file tree species used, and make the appropriate treatment

3. Command parameters:

pathname: directory path to find the command you are looking for. For example. To indicate the current directory, use / to represent system root.
-print: File find command match to standard output.
-exec: find the command shell command parameters given to matching files. The corresponding form of the command to 'command' {} \ ;, and note {} \; spaces between.
-ok: -exec and the role of the same, but in a more secure mode to execute shell commands given by the parameter before executing each command will prompt you to allow users to determine whether to execute.

4. Command Options:

-name find files by file name.
-perm to find files by file permissions.
-prune Using this option makes find command is not specified directory to find the current, if you use the -depth option, -prune find command will be ignored.
-user according to the file owner to locate the file.
-group according to the group the file belongs to locate the file.
-mtime -n + n change according to time of the file to find the file, - n represents the file to change the time from now within n days, + n that file to change the time from now n days ago. find command -atime and -ctime options, but they all -m time and options.
Find files without a valid -nogroup belongs to the group that the file belongs to the group does not exist in the / etc / groups in.
-nouser Find files without a valid owner, the owner of the file does not exist in the / etc / passwd in.
-newer file1! file2 look for changes over time, but the new file file1 file2 older than the file file.
-type find a certain type of file, such as:
b - block device file.
d - directory.
c - a character device file.
p - pipe file.
l - a symbolic link file.
f - regular file.
-size n: [c] Find files file n blocks of length, in bytes represents the length of the file when with c. -depth: when you find a file, first locate the files in the current directory, and then in its subdirectories.
-fstype: Find the file is located in a certain type of file system, these file system types can usually be found in the configuration file / etc / fstab, the configuration file contains information about the file system of the present system.
-mount: When searching files do not cross file system mount points.
-follow: If the find command encounters a symbolic link file, just follow the link points to a file.
-cpio: file matching using cpio command to back up these files to tape devices.

In addition, the following three differences:

-amin n search system in the last N minutes to access files
-atime n search system in the last n * 24 hours access to documents
-cmin n search system in the last minute N file status is changed files
-ctime n search system in the last n * 24 Xiaoshi changed files file status
Last minute -mmin n N lookup system is changed file data file
-mtime n search system last changed n * 24 Xiaoshi file data file

Two, find command usage examples

find some common examples of some common parameters and some specific usage and precautions.

1. Using the name option:

Filename option is to find the most commonly used command options, this option is either used alone or with other option. You can use one of the file name pattern to match files, remember to use quotation marks around the file name pattern quotes. No matter what the current path is that if you want to find the file name in the root directory of your $ HOME that match * .log files, use ~ as 'pathname' arguments, the tilde ~ represents your $ HOME directory.

find ~ -name "* .log" -print

Want to find all the '* .log' file in the current directory and subdirectories, you can use:

find. -name "* .log" -print

The current directory and subdirectories to find the desired file name with a capital letter at the beginning of the file, you can use:

find. -name "[A-Z] *" -print

Find the file name you want to host at the beginning of the file in the / etc directory, you can use:

find / etc -name "host *" -print

Want to find $ HOME directory files, you can use:

find ~ -name "*" -print or find. -print

To get a high system load operation starts from the root directory to find all the files.

find / -name "*" -print

If you want to find the file in the current directory name beginning with a lowercase letter, finally ending 4-9 plus .log file:

command:

find. -name "[a-z] * [4-9] .log" -print

Output:

[Root @ localhost test] # ll

Total 316

-rw-r - r-- 1 root root 302108 11-13 06:03 log2012.log

-rw-r - r-- 1 root root 61 11-13 06:03 log2013.log

-rw-r - r-- 1 root root 0 11-13 06:03 log2014.log

-rw-r - r-- 1 root root 0 11-13 06:06 log2015.log

drwxr-xr-x 6 root root 4096 10-27 01:58 scf

drwxrwxr-x 2 root root 4096 11-13 06:08 test3

drwxrwxr-x 2 root root 4096 11-13 05:50 test4

[Root @ localhost test] # find. -name "[A-z] * [4-9] .log" -print

./log2014.log

./log2015.log

./test4/log2014.log

[Root @ localhost test] #

2. With perm options:

In accordance with the file permissions mode -perm option, press the file permissions mode to find the file, then. Best to use the octal representation of permissions.

Such as finding files in the current directory permission bits 755 files, document owner can read, write, execute, other users can read and execute files, you can use:

[Root @ localhost test] # find. -perm 755 -print

.

./scf

./scf/lib

./scf/service

./scf/service/deploy

./scf/service/deploy/product

./scf/service/deploy/info

./scf/doc

./scf/bin

[Root @ localhost test] #

There is also a method of expression: in the octal number in front to add a dash - indicates match, as the equivalent of 777 -007, -005 is equivalent to 555,

command:

find. -perm -005

Output:

[Root @ localhost test] # ll

Total 316

-rw-r - r-- 1 root root 302108 11-13 06:03 log2012.log

-rw-r - r-- 1 root root 61 11-13 06:03 log2013.log

-rw-r - r-- 1 root root 0 11-13 06:03 log2014.log

-rw-r - r-- 1 root root 0 11-13 06:06 log2015.log

drwxr-xr-x 6 root root 4096 10-27 01:58 scf

drwxrwxr-x 2 root root 4096 11-13 06:08 test3

drwxrwxr-x 2 root root 4096 11-13 05:50 test4

[Root @ localhost test] # find. -perm -005

.

./test4

./scf

./scf/lib

./scf/service

./scf/service/deploy

./scf/service/deploy/product

./scf/service/deploy/info

./scf/doc

./scf/bin

./test3

[Root @ localhost test] #

3. Ignore a directory:

If you want to ignore a directory, the directory because you know that you do not want to find a file, you can use -prune option to indicate the directory to be ignored when looking for files. When using -prune option should be careful, because if you use the -depth option, the option will be -prune find command ignored. If you want to find files in the test directory, but do not want to look at test / test3 directory, you can use:

command:

find test -path "test / test3" -prune -o -print

Output:

[Root @ localhost soft] # find test -path "test / test3" -prune -o -print

test

test / log2014.log

test / log2015.log

test / test4

test / test4 / log2014.log

test / test4 / log2013.log

test / test4 / log2012.log

test / scf

test / scf / lib

test / scf / service

test / scf / service / deploy

test / scf / service / deploy / product

test / scf / service / deploy / info

test / scf / doc

test / scf / bin

test / log2013.log

test / log2012.log

[Root @ localhost soft] #

4. Find Files using find how to avoid when a file directory:

Example 1: Find test4 not in subdirectories of all files in the test directory

command:

find test -path "test / test4" -prune -o -print

Output:

[Root @ localhost soft] # find test

test

test / log2014.log

test / log2015.log

test / test4

test / test4 / log2014.log

test / test4 / log2013.log

test / test4 / log2012.log

test / scf

test / scf / lib

test / scf / service

test / scf / service / deploy

test / scf / service / deploy / product

test / scf / service / deploy / info

test / scf / doc

test / scf / bin

test / log2013.log

test / log2012.log

test / test3

[Root @ localhost soft] # find test -path "test / test4" -prune -o -print

test

test / log2014.log

test / log2015.log

test / scf

test / scf / lib

test / scf / service

test / scf / service / deploy

test / scf / service / deploy / product

test / scf / service / deploy / info

test / scf / doc

test / scf / bin

test / log2013.log

test / log2012.log

test / test3

[Root @ localhost soft] #

Explanation:

find [-path ..] [expression]

After the path is a list of expressions

-path "test" -prune -o -print is -path shorthand expression "test" -a -prune -o -print sequentially evaluated, -a and -o are short-circuit evaluation, and shell and && Similarly, if ||

-path "test" is true, then evaluated -prune, -prune returns true, the logical expression is true; otherwise not evaluated -prune, and the logical expression is false. If -path "test" -a -prune is false, evaluates -print, -print returns true or logical expression is true; otherwise not evaluated -print, or logical expression is true.

This expression can be used in combination exception pseudo code is written as:

if -path "test" then

-prune

else

-print

Example 2: avoid multiple folders:

command:

find test \ (-path test / test4 -o -path test / test3 \) -prune -o -print

Output:

[Root @ localhost soft] # find test \ (-path test / test4 -o -path test / test3 \) -prune -o -print

test

test / log2014.log

test / log2015.log

test / scf

test / scf / lib

test / scf / service

test / scf / service / deploy

test / scf / service / deploy / product

test / scf / service / deploy / info

test / scf / doc

test / scf / bin

test / log2013.log

test / log2012.log

[Root @ localhost soft] #

Explanation:

Parentheses indicate binding expression. \ Indicates references indicate shell right behind the character as a special interpretation, and left to find the command to interpret its meaning.


Example 3: Find a defined file, -name and other options added after -o

command:

find test \ (- path test / test4 -o -path test / test3 \) -prune -o -name "* .log" -print

Output:

[Root @ localhost soft] # find test \ (-path test / test4 -o -path test / test3 \) -prune -o -name "* .log" -print

test / log2014.log

test / log2015.log

test / log2013.log

test / log2012.log

[Root @ localhost soft] #

5. Nouser use and user options:

Find files by file owner:

Example 1: In $ HOME directory to find the file owner to file peida

command:

find ~ -user peida -print

Example 2: In the / etc directory to find the file owner to peida file:

command:

find / etc -user peida -print

Explanation:

Example 3: To find the owner of the account has been deleted file, you can use -nouser option. Find all such files in the / home directory

command:

find / home -nouser -print

Explanation:

This makes it possible to find that the owner of the account without a valid file / etc / passwd file. When using -nouser option, do not give the user name; find command can help you to complete the work.

6. The use of group and nogroup options:

Like user options and nouser same set of files for the user belongs, find command also has the same option, to look at / apps directory for files that gem of a user group can be used:

find / apps -group gem -print

To find no valid user group all the files, you can use nogroup option. The following find command to find such a file from the root directory of the file system:

find / -nogroup-print

7. According to the change of time or access time to find the file:

If you want to change in accordance with the time to find a file, you can use the mtime, atime or ctime options. If suddenly there is no available space, and most likely length of one file during this rapid growth, then you can use mtime options to find such files.

Minus sign - to change the time defined in the file n days or less ago, but with a plus sign + to change the time defined in the file before n days ago.

Want to change the time in the system to find the root of the file within 5 days, you can use:

find / -mtime -5 -print

To find under / var / adm file directory to change the time in the past 3 days, you can use:

find / var / adm -mtime +3 -print

8. Find a file than new or old files:

If you want to look for changes over time a file is new, but older than the other files all files, you can use -newer option.

Its general form:

newest_file_name! oldest_file_name

among them,! Is a logical non-symbolic.

Example 1: Find the time change than the file log2012.log new but the old file than the file log2017.log

command:

find -newer log2012.log! -newer log2017.log

Output:

[Root @ localhost test] # ll

Total 316

-rw-r - r-- 1 root root 302108 11-13 06:03 log2012.log

-rw-r - r-- 1 root root 61 11-13 06:03 log2013.log

-rw-r - r-- 1 root root 0 11-13 06:03 log2014.log

-rw-r - r-- 1 root root 0 11-13 06:06 log2015.log

-rw-r - r-- 1 root root 0 11-16 14:41 log2016.log

-rw-r - r-- 1 root root 0 11-16 14:43 log2017.log

drwxr-xr-x 6 root root 4096 10-27 01:58 scf

drwxrwxr-x 2 root root 4096 11-13 06:08 test3

drwxrwxr-x 2 root root 4096 11-13 05:50 test4

[Root @ localhost test] # find -newer log2012.log! -newer Log2017.log

.

./log2015.log

./log2017.log

./log2016.log

./test3

[Root @ localhost test] #

Example 2: Change the time to find a new file in the file than log2012.log

command:

find. -newer log2012.log -print

Output:

[Root @ localhost test] # find -newer log2012.log

.

./log2015.log

./log2017.log

./log2016.log

./test3

[Root @ localhost test] #

9. Use the type option:

Example 1: Find all directories under the / etc directory

command:

find / etc -type d -print

Example 2: Find all types of files in a directory other than the current directory

command:

find.! -type d -print

Example 3: Find all symbolic link files in the / etc directory

command:

find / etc -type l -print

10. Use size option:

Can follow the file length to find a file, the file size may be referred to herein as the metering block (block), it can also be measured in bytes. To express a byte file length measurement of N c; metering block length of the file can be represented only by numbers.

When searching file by file length, generally use this file size in bytes, the size of the viewing of the file system, because then measured using a block to more easily converted.

Files in the current directory to find the file length is greater than 1 M byte: Example 1

command:

find. -size + 1000000c -print

Example 2: Find the length of the file in / home / apache directory exactly 100 bytes of the file:

command:

find / home / apache -size 100c -print

Example 3: Find the length of more than 10 files in the current directory (equivalent to a 512-byte)

command:

find. -size +10 -print

11. Use depth options:

When using the find command, you may want to match all of the files, and then look in the subdirectory. Use depth options can make the find command to do so. One reason for doing this is that when the file system backup to tape using the find command, want to first back up all the files, and then followed by the backup files in subdirectories.

Examples 1: find command from the root of the file system to start, find a file named CON.FILE of.

command:

find / -name "CON.FILE" -depth -print

Explanation:

It will first of all matching files and then re-enter the subdirectory Find

12. Use mount options:

  Find the file in the current file system (no access to other file system), you can use the mount command option to find.

Example 1: starting from the current directory to find the file system is located in this file name XC file ending

command:

find. -name "* .XC" -mount -print

13,

Check all current common file directory, and - using the ls -l command e x e c option will list them

. # Find -type f -exec ls -l {} \;
-rw-r-r- 1 root root 34928 2003-02-25 ./conf/httpd.conf
-rw-r-r- 1 root root 12959 2003-02-25 ./conf/magic
-rw-r-r- 1 root root 180 2003-02-25 ./conf.d/README

Fetty: name, sex, age, specific occupation is unknown, but no contact information. I park in the blog published article (including but not limited to: Chinese, English, punctuation marks, images, and any combination of the above English, etc.) are the keyboard, mouse, screen and other tools caused by the results, I used to test computers, monitors various mechanical properties, optical properties, do not represent my point of view, any similarity, honored!

14, ok option


Query file and asks if you want to display
[Root @ linuxidc class] # find ./ -mtime -1 -type f -ok ls -l {} \;
? Y
-rw-r-r- 1 cnscn cnscn 13709 1 Yue 12 12:22 ./classDB.inc.php
[Root @ linuxidc class] # find ./ -mtime -1 -type f -ok ls -l {} \;
? N
[Root @ linuxidc class] #

    find / -name filename -exec rm -rf {} \;
    find / -name filename -ok rm -rf {} \;

15,

To deal with queries and to awk
[Root @ linuxidc class] # who | awk '{print $ 1 "\ t" $ 2}'
cnscn pts / 0

=================================================
awk-grep-sed

[Root @ linuxidc class] # df -k | awk '{print $ 1}' | grep -v 'none' | sed s "/ \ / dev \ /// g"
File system
sda2
sda1
[Root @ linuxidc class] # df -k | awk '{print $ 1}' | grep -v 'none'
File system
/ Dev / sda2
/ Dev / sda1


Three, find the command Q

I find / -name filename | rm -rf, unsuccessful, unsuccessful ask why?

find / -name filename -exec rm -rf {} \;
find -name filename |. rm -rf {} that you try to find out the results.
\; The equivalent of "the Constitution", said the head of nothing, is so stipulated in the back -exec need a symbol of the end of the command, he said. The answer can be found in the man find.
Let's find rm result of the recognition, as follows:
find / -name filename | xargs rm -rf
The reason find -name filename |. Rm -rf not pass, because the rm command does not accept input from the standard pass over instruction
Find files containing specific strings
For example, find the current directory containing the "the string you want find ..." string file:
. $ Find -type f -exec grep "the string you want find ..." {}; -print

Fourth, use your own experience

1, find the specific output modified several files

[Linuxidc @ xingzhengzhongxin Exp] $ ls Para.1106. * Para.1107. * Para.1109. * -al
-rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 5178 Apr 11 22:30 Para.1106.00000227.77.00
-rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 22043 Apr 11 22:30 Para.1107.00000227.77.00
-rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 7410 Apr 11 22:30 Para.1109.00000227.77.00

... [Linuxidc @ xingzhengzhongxin Exp] $ ls Para.1106 * Para.1107 * Para.1109 * -al --time-style "+% Y-% m-% d% H:% M:% S" | awk '{print $ 8 "\ t" $ 6 "" $ 7}'
Para.1106.00000227.77.00 2014-04-11 22:30:44
Para.1107.00000227.77.00 2014-04-11 22:30:45
Para.1109.00000227.77.00 2014-04-11 22:30:46

[Linuxidc @ xingzhengzhongxin Exp] $ ls -l | find / linuxidc / Data / Para / Exp / -name "Para.1106 *." -o -name "Para.1108 *." -o -name "Para.1109. * "
/linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1108.00000227.77.00
/linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1106.00000227.77.00
/linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1109.00000227.77.00

[Linuxidc @ xingzhengzhongxin Exp] $ find / linuxidc / Data / Para / Exp / -name "Para.1106. *" -ls -o -name "Para.1108. *" -ls -o -name "Para.1109. * "-ls | sort -n
3473431 12 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 5178 Apr 11 22:30 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1106.00000227.77.00
3473433 8 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 3670 Apr 11 22:30 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1108.00000227.77.00
3473434 12 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 7410 Apr 11 22:30 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1109.00000227.77.00

[Linuxidc @ xingzhengzhongxin Exp] $ find / linuxidc / Data / Para / Exp / -name "Para.1106. *" -ls -o -name "Para.1108. *" -ls -o -name "Para.1109. * "-ls | sort -n | awk -F '/' '{print $ 6}'
Para.1106.00000227.77.00
Para.1108.00000227.77.00
Para.1109.00000227.77.00

[Linuxidc @ linuxidc ~] $ find / linuxidc / Data / Para / Exp / -name ". Para.1106 *" -o -name ". Para.1108 *" -o -name "Para.1109 *." | Xargs ls -l --time-style "+% Y-% m-% d% H:% M:% S"
-rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 5178 2014-04-15 09:08:14 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1106.00000223.77.00
-rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 3670 2014-04-15 09:08:15 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1108.00000223.77.00
-rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 7410 2014-04-15 09:08:15 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1109.00000223.77.00


[Root @ fz ~] # find / linuxidc / params / -name "Para.1106. *" -ls -o -name "Para.1108. *" -ls -o -name "Para.1109. *" -ls | sort -n | awk -F '/' '{print $ 4}'
Para.1106.00000000.0000000077.00
Para.1108.00000000.0000000077.00

2,

1901 profile Time:

ls /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1901.* --full-time | awk '{print $ 6 "\ t" $ 7}' | awk -F '{print $ 1}' '.'

3,

2 # LC send packets (yesterday can not get dates)
ls / linuxidc / Data / bak / $ (date +% Y_% m_) 25 / Outer / Acc | wc -l
= / Linuxidc / Data / bak / 2015_08_25 / Outer / Acc

PACC server:
pacc received # 1

find / linuxidc / Data / bak / $ (date -d last-day +% Y_% m_% d) / Outer / Lc / -name '* _62010001 *' | wc -l

pacc received 2 #

find / linuxidc / Data / bak / $ (date -d last-day +% Y_% m_% d) / Outer / Lc / -name '* _62020001 *' | wc -l

Send pacc
find / linuxidc / Data / Transaction / YKT_Snd / -name "*` date -d last-day +% y% m% d` * "| wc -l

4, another ls command output file written time

 1 [linuxidc @ linuxidc ~] $ cd / linuxidc / Data / Para / Exp /
 2 [linuxidc @ linuxidc Exp] $ ls
 3 Para.1002.00000223.1293.00 Para.1011.00000223.6.00 Para.1101.00000223.6.00 Para.1108.00000223.80.00 Para.1919.00000223.20130307.00
 4 Para.1005.00000223.1.00 Para.1021.00000223.3.00 Para.1102.00000223.2.00 Para.1109.00000223.80.00 Para.1920.00000223.2.00
 5 Para.1006.00000223.1732.00 Para.1031.00000223.8.00 Para.1103.00000223.77.00 Para.1901.00000223.20150812.00 Para.1921.00000223.1.00
 6 Para.1007.01022300.195.00 Para.1041.00000223.2.00 Para.1104.00000223.548.00 Para.1912.00000223.20130307.00
 7 Para.1007.02022300.195.00 Para.1089.00000223.5.00 Para.1105.00000223.77.00 Para.1913.00000223.20130307.00
 8 Para.1007.1F022300.195.00 Para.1090.00000223.431.00 Para.1106.00000223.79.00 Para.1914.00000223.20130307.00
 9 Para.1007.33022300.195.00 Para.1097.00000223.1.00 Para.1107.00000223.77.00 Para.1918.00000223.20110913.00
10 [linuxidc @ linuxidc Exp] $ ls -l
11 total 368
12 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 102 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1002.00000223.1293.00
13 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 136 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1005.00000223.1.00
14 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 2664 Aug 12 18:51 Para.1006.00000223.1732.00
15 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 1934 Aug 9 02:02 Para.1007.01022300.195.00
16 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 1966 Aug 9 02:02 Para.1007.02022300.195.00
17 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 1838 Aug 9 02:02 Para.1007.1F022300.195.00
18 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 1790 Aug 9 02:02 Para.1007.33022300.195.00
19 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 226 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1011.00000223.6.00
20 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 144 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1021.00000223.3.00
21 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 410 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1031.00000223.8.00
22 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 108 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1041.00000223.2.00
23 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 119 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1089.00000223.5.00
24 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 1776 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1090.00000223.431.00
25 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 204 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1097.00000223.1.00
26 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 905 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1101.00000223.6.00
27 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 1159 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1102.00000223.2.00
28 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 764 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1103.00000223.77.00
29 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 19598 Aug 13 02:03 Para.1104.00000223.548.00
30 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 5763 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1105.00000223.77.00
31 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 5658 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1106.00000223.79.00
32 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 22043 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1107.00000223.77.00
33 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 4342 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1108.00000223.80.00
34 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 8018 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1109.00000223.80.00
35 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 65876 Aug 13 03:13 Para.1901.00000223.20150812.00
36 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 400 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1912.00000223.20130307.00
37 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 278 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1913.00000223.20130307.00
38 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 413 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1914.00000223.20130307.00
39 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 252 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1918.00000223.20110913.00
40 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 233 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1919.00000223.20130307.00
41 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 80 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1920.00000223.2.00
42 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 80 Jun 12 06:35 Para.1921.00000223.1.00
43
44 [linuxidc @ linuxidc Exp] $ ls / linuxidc / Data / Para / Exp / *
45 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1002.00000223.1293.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1089.00000223.5.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1109.00000223.80.00
46 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1005.00000223.1.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1090.00000223.431.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1901.00000223.20150812.00
47 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1006.00000223.1732.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1097.00000223.1.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1912.00000223.20130307.00
48 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1007.01022300.195.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1101.00000223.6.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1913.00000223.20130307.00
49 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1007.02022300.195.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1102.00000223.2.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1914.00000223.20130307.00
50 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1007.1F022300.195.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1103.00000223.77.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1918.00000223.20110913.00
51 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1007.33022300.195.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1104.00000223.548.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1919.00000223.20130307.00
52 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1011.00000223.6.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1105.00000223.77.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1920.00000223.2.00
53 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1021.00000223.3.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1106.00000223.79.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1921.00000223.1.00
54 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1031.00000223.8.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1107.00000223.77.00
55 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1041.00000223.2.00 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1108.00000223.80.00
56 [linuxidc @ linuxidc Exp] $ ls /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1901.*
57 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1901.00000223.20150812.00
58 [linuxidc @ linuxidc Exp] $ ls /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1901.* --full-time
59 -rw-r - r-- 1 linuxidc aas 65876 2015-08-13 03: 13: 23.000000000 +0800 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1901.00000223.20150812.00
60 [linuxidc @ linuxidc Exp] $ ls /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1901.* --full-time | awk '{print $ 6 "\ t" $ 7}'
612015-08-1303: 13: 23.000000000
62 [linuxidc @ linuxidc Exp] $ ls /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1901.* --full-time | awk '{print $ 6 "\ t" $ 7}' | awk -F '{'. ' print $ 1} '
632015-08-13 03:13:23
64 [linuxidc @ linuxidc Exp] $ ls /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1901.* --full-time | awk '{print $ 6 "\ t" $ 7 "\ t" $ 9}'
65 2015-08-13 03: 13: 23.000000000 /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1901.00000223.20150812.00
66 [linuxidc @ linuxidc Exp] $ ls /linuxidc/Data/Para/Exp/Para.1901.* --full-time | awk '{print $ 6 "\ t" $ 7 "\ t" $ 9}' | awk -F '.' '{print $ 1 "\ t" $ 3}'
672015-08-13 03:13:23 1901
68 [linuxidc @ linuxidc Exp] $
     
         
         
         
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